Life is full of polarities, doesn’t it seem? There’s so much “this OR that,” and people get so caught up in whether THIS is right or THAT is right–and the “thises” fight so hard to prove the “thats” wrong and vice versa. Wouldn’t it be nice if in all aspects of life, there was room for this AND that? That both could be right? Or that this might be right for some people, while that might be right for others…right?

Want to know what I think?

I think most people benefit from a little bit of this and a little bit of that. Today, I want to take that idea to skincare–and talk about how we no longer have to have the debate of DIY skincare vs professional skincare. At first, I’ll be honest–I believed what I was taught in aesthetics school that DIY and OTC skincare were less effective, and even were potentially dangerous. But that view changed quite a bit after I dove deeper into herbalism, making my own skincare, and using my own skincare creations on my clients and seeing the results that happened. I talk about that more in this article.

I also wrote a post about professional skincare that was considered a bit controversial among aestheticians at the time (and still is, if I’m being totally honest!), where I debunk the idea that the “professional” skincare products that most aestheticians use in their practices and sell to their clients are more effective, higher quality, and more concentrated than skincare products that are sold to the general public (which aestheticians refer to as “OTC products”, or DIY skincare products. Aestheticians have been sold the idea that only they can sell these products because they are licensed, and therefore can handle and “prescribe” more “active” ingredients which supposedly have a more dramatic effect on the skin. Sorry to tell you, friends, but none of that is actually true, “Professional skincare” is a marketing term, just like “cosmeceutical.” It’s meaningless when it comes to defining the quality of the actual ingredients and formulation. All it means is that these are products that are marketed to professionals, rather than to the general public. If you’re an aesthetician, before you get mad at me, read the rest of that post HERE–because I promise you, it makes a lot of sense.

Chemical exfoliation treatmentBack to my initial point of this post: in professional skincare–meaning in the aesthetic treatment room and retail spa, I believe there is room for both DIY skincare (which I now prefer to call boutique or herbal skincare) and products that are marketed to professional. And quite frankly, if I make a product line and market it only to professionals, I’ve then made professional skincare.

I had the opportunity to shed light on DIY skincare in the professional skincare setting in my latest article in Dermascope Magazine, “10 Things about DIY Skincare.”

Click HERE to read it.

I’ll give you of the 10 things here–you’ll have to read the article to get all the details:

1. Whole foods and plants can benefit the skin.

2. Fresh ingredients are nutrient dense.

3. There are other forms of DIY skincare than kitchen DIY.

4. A properly formulated DIY skincare product can be just as, or more, concentrated as professional products.

5. There is a big misconception that DIY skincare puts people more at risk of developing allergies than synthetic skin care.

6. Not all DIY skincare is safe.

7. DIY skin care that contains fresh food, plant matter, or water must be preserved to be safe.

8. Natural preservation is not a simple topic.

9. Even anhydrous products can become contaminated.

10. The most common natural preservatives found in online DIY skincare recipes are not actually preservatives.

I hope you take the time to read the full article at Dermascope!

But the bottom line is that DIY skincare is awesome, safe, super-effective, and is legal to use and sell in the professional setting. That being said, there are guidelines and laws to follow, and there is certainly a lot of information you need to know to ensure that you’re doing it right in terms of ingredient selection, formulation, safety and stability testing, packaging, and more. If you’re an aesthetician and you still love a certain professional skincare line, then by all means–continue to sell it! But I also encourage you to offer your clients a little bit of DIY too–because you never know when a client might need a little more of this than that.

And I teach you how to create and customize all natural, boutique skincare for your clients in my online course, Create Your Skincare Professional Edition!

If you’re a skincare professional, check out our Professional Edition, and if you’re not a skincare professional but want to make yourself professional DIY skincare the right way, check out our Personal Edition.

You can even start either skincare journey today with a free class HERE!

What’s your experience with DIY skincare in the professional setting?

I’d love to hear your thoughts. Please share in the comments below!

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This